I can walk, but I will crawl there
closedd00r:

lol
Excellent nature blogs with original content

I wanted to chime in and share some amazing blogs that post great original photographs and content pertaining to wildlife and nature (in particular, reptiles and amphibians).

In Desperate Need Of Some Adventures

Beautiful nature and wildlife photography, as well as excellent field herping finds. The reptiles and amphibians of Europe are quite interesting.

Steep Ravine

Amazing photography of the great outdoors, with a particular fondness to mycology and life living under logs.

Tactical Veterinarian

Veterinarian with an emphasis in herpetology. Great information, videos, and photos alike.

Exploreth Thy Wilderness

Flawless nature photography. Beautiful landscape shots, as well as some of the best field herping photographs I have ever seen.

San Francisco Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea coerulea)- San Francisco, CA

San Francisco Alligator Lizard (Elgaria coerulea coerulea)- San Francisco, CA

Coast Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis zonata multifasciata)- San Mateo County, CA

Coast Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis zonata multifasciata)- San Mateo County, CA

thedownhouse:

The Bay Bridged released a mixtape of Bay Area punk and stuff and we’re fortunate enough to be on it (along with the likes of Scalped, Replica, The New Flesh, and a bunch more)! Go listen to the playlist and check out all the bands featured on it.

carloscruzphotography:

SCALPED - SF Music Collective 2 Year Anniversary - 4/16/14 - Submission Art Space

This band blew people away. Don’t sleep on them.

http://scalped415.bandcamp.com/

When I am not out looking for snakes, this is what I do.

fishmostly:

snakefan88:

I went hiking and found a  little garter snake. :D  It was 7:30, 8pm, and me and my boyfriend were coming back out of the trail when I saw this little one make a break for the leaves.  I caught it by the tail/midsection area and gently lifted it out of the brush.  It was thrashing around, so I held its head (while it threaded its body through my fingers to generously apply musk to my hands) until it calmed down enough for me to let it go and have it crawl through my hands.

It was a lovely little garter, with pastel pink sides and very little pattern.  Didn’t have any scarring or damage to it, either, and was nice and plump.  I held it long enough to take a few pictures before I let it go.  It was a little bit reluctant to release my hand from its grip, though.

Wait zacharge is this really a garter snake? Which species?

It is indeed a Garter Snake (Genus: Thamnophis).

My first impression (as well as reaffirmed by some fellow herpers on the Field Herp Forum) was that it is within the species sirtalis. However, pinpointing a specific subspecies will be difficult without some locality information.

What state and county was it found in?

Handsome snake, by the way.

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis)- Contra Costa County, CA
A very dark colored ring-necked snake with defined scales.

Pacific Ring-necked Snake (Diadophis punctatus amabilis)- Contra Costa County, CA

A very dark colored ring-necked snake with defined scales.

Scalped is playing tonight at Submission (aka Balazo for you old Bay Area kids) with Loma Prieta, Fucking Invincible, Creative Adult, and The Down House.

2183 Mission Street. San Francisco. 7:30 PM.

We will have demo tapes. Come out and rage. Or not. Up to you.

In regards to snake venom

The below was my addition to the post about the coral snake that was killed. People often forget that venom is not only used for defense, but also for predation.

"One should also remember that venom, although an ideal defense against predators, is also used (quite possibly evolved for) to capture prey.

The majority of venomous snakes target prey items that are either difficult to catch or may present harm during capture (take for example a Rattlesnake [Genus: Crotalus] hunting a large ground squirrel- these large rodents can inflict some damage back). Potent and fast acting venom works well to ensure the capture of the prey item as well as minimizes predator/prey interaction.

In regards to North American Coral Snakes, their preferred prey items are other snakes (generally fossorial species, such as Tantilla), which are usually fast and hard for other snakes to catch. Hence, a potent and fast acting venom is necessary.”